Photo Friday: D-Day: The Great Reckoning

20140606 [D-Day]

Today’s Blogpost was selected and written by Will Reid, former staff member at LJMU Libraries, now working at the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts.

70 years ago today saw D-Day: the landing of 156,000 allied troops on the shores of Normandy, supported by 4,000 vehicles, 11,000 planes and 5,000 ships. Over a year in the planning, using a range of deceptions to conceal the date and target, this was the most exhaustive naval operation in history and an astonishingly complex achievement. By the end of the day and at the cost of approximately 5,000 American, British, Canadian and Norwegian casualties, the beachheads were taken and the road to the end of the Nazi occupation of Europe had opened. The cartoon below is from The Daily Mirror dated 7th June 1944, and reflects the joy and determination of the country that the long awaited “Second Front” had begun. It shows a British soldier supported by an American Ranger knocking on “Nazi Fortress Europe” with a bill of reckoning for the years of “murder, rape, arson, looting and all the other filthy crimes of fascism”. The allies liberated Paris three months later, and Nazi Germany surrendered on 8th May 1945.

The Daily Mirror is available from the Daily Mirror Digital Archive, available at the A-Z list of databases, from the Electronic Library Page. The archive covers the years from 1903 right up to today.

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