Photo Friday: Costumes for the Watering Places

20130823 [Young Englishwoman]With the weather expected to heat up again for the bank holiday weekend, imagine how you would cope with the heat in these outfits!

This week our photo Friday is taken from the August 1876 issue of “The Young Englishwoman: A Journal for Ladies” (No. 32, Volume 7), from the Liddell Hart Collection of Costume. This collection has recently been relocated to the Aldham Robarts Library to make it more accessible.

The illustration shows some of the latest Paris fashions for August, specifically “Costumes for the Watering Places”.  The attached article observes that for new fashions one should look “at all fashionable watering and seaside places”, but that the new costumes for the beach are all invented and made in Paris.

Given the heavy nature of these costumes, it is hardly surprising that one of the advertisements in the journal is for “Rowlands’ Kalydor”;

Ladies Travelling, Visiting the Seaside, Rinking, Driving, or otherwise exposed to the scorching rays of the sun and heated particles of dust, will find Rowlands’ Kalydor most cooling and refreshing for the face, hands and arms.  It eradicates Sunburn, Freckles, Tan, Stings of Insects etc.  4s. 6d. and 8s.6d. per bottle.

The Liddell Hart Collection of Costume is a highly individual fashion archive, containing not only works directly concerning fashion, but also on feminism, psychology of dress and the social scene and society at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth century. It contains some delightful books of drawings by famous illustrators such as Charles Dana Gibson, Mars and Guillaume. There are approximately 350 books in the collection, along with scrapbook material of cartoons, poems and cuttings on modes and manners of the nineteenth century, folders of original early coloured fashion plates and many other interesting items.  Most items in the collection can be found through the library catalogue, and accessed on request.

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